Monday, 3 October 2011

Copenhagen Fall Out - Niels Bohr & Werner Heisenberg

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Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg were close friends before the war and the race to create an atomic bomb commenced. In many ways they were both puppets for the war making profit-machine cunningly disguised as a plain old axis-of-money and power. This was the Bush family banking interests from the time of Prescott Walker Bush who funded the rise of Nazi Germany through close links with I.G. Farben. It's an annoying feature of early third millennium living that calling the Bush family Nazis raises a weak smile of ironic recognition when regrettably I'm being serious.

Like men many before and after them, Bohr and Heisenberg were divided and ruled by ancient bloodline and business dynasties doing what they do best. They had no idea who was ultimately pulling the strings of history while the rest of humanity got on with what we do best. Singing songs, waving flags and stomping off to the battlefields to slaughter each other.

The documentary isn't too bad if one factors in the the real history of the global race to build a bomb. It doesn't take to much imagination to portray the 20th century as little more than a game to observe who would build the ultimate weapon first, and see how they would dominate the rest of the planet with the power it bestows.

Evidence for prehistoric atomic weapons is found in glassy fused sand remains, corpses that died instantaneously in blistering heat and high radioactivity readings  in the same locations where the Mahabharata outlines these conflicts took place. Add those ancient Indian scripture quotes from the Baghavad Gita that Robert Oppenheimer used after Trinity tests and it all looks a little like some grand cyclical monkey drama, endlessly looping until such time as men wake up and understand that manipulation is the Occam's razor explanation for an entire planet where greed is rewarded, death on the battlefield is lionized and taking more than one needs is celebrated.